WVU-led research team lays foundation for natural gas storage ‘hub’; opportunity for economic growth in the region

On August 29, WVU is releasing to the public a study that shows how the region can support storage facilities that are critical for attracting petrochemical and related industries to the area. Researchers will present the data at a technical workshop in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, hosted by the Eastern Petroleum Technology Transfer Council, PTTC, at WVU.

“Appalachia is poised for a renaissance of the petrochemical industry due to the availability of natural gas liquids,” said Brian Anderson, director of the WVU Energy Institute. “A critical path for this rebirth is through the development of infrastructure to support the industry. The Appalachian Storage Hub study is a first step for realizing that necessary infrastructure.”

Podcast: Patrick Kirby explains how communities can get help with dilapidated buildings

 

Patrick Kirby, director of Northern West Virginia Brownfields Assistance Center, explains how WVU helps cities and counties in the state deal with BAD buildings – Blighted, Abandoned and Dilapidated structures that degrade the quality of life in our communities.  Gary Bowden interviews Kirby as part of his WAJR radio broadcast.  Go to the podcast here (starts at 27:38). 

Register now for the 2017 BAD Buildings Summit, Nov. 14

At the BAD Buildings Summit, learn how to rehabilitate Brownfields, Abandoned, and Dilapidated (BAD) Buildings in your community by networking with other leaders across the state dealing with the same challenges.

Participants will see presentations by resource providers, practitioners, and technical experts on topics including demolition, codes and ordinances, funding, resources, engaging stakeholders, and sustainable reuse options for vacant properties.