WVU advances technology and transparency to shale gas in new MSEEL site

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.— Improving shale energy productivity and reducing the environmental footprint of the natural gas industry are the goals of a West Virginia University partnership at a second Marcellus Shale Energy and Environmental Lab to be located in western Monongalia County. 

WVU researchers from multidisciplinary departments, as well as undergraduate and graduate students, will use the advanced models they develop for this project, continuing to address complex technical, environmental and social issues surrounding unconventional energy development. The researchers will use best practices in environmentally responsible shale development as they undertake subsurface scientific investigations.

WVU state water conference to highlight flooding and pipelines

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - West Virginia often feels the ravages of hurricanes and tropical storms that hit U.S. coasts hundreds of miles away like Florence did last weekend in North Carolina. Even if the hurricane drops as little as two-to-four inches of rain, flooding concerns remain in parts of West Virginia.

“This region is particularly susceptible to large amounts of rain from intense storms, including remnants of hurricanes such as Florence,” said Mike Strager, professor of resource economics and management at West Virginia University. He and researchers Jacquelyn Strager and Nicolas Zegre have been studying ways to better understand and map the region to identify specific areas in West Virginia that are more susceptible than others to such storms.  

WVU hosts information exchange between Sister Cities Morgantown and Xuzhou

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. - Although half a world away from one another, Sister Cities Morgantown and Xuzhou in the Peoples Republic of China shared common ground at a day-long meeting, highlighting initiatives for redeveloping old mined land and industrial sites to promote economic development. 

Delegations from the two cities met in Morgantown Aug. 21 hosted by the West Virginia University U.S.-China Energy Center of the Energy Institute / National Research Center for Coal and Energy and Morgantown’s Sister Cities Commission. 

WVU opens new research facility to extract valuable rare earths from acid mine drainage

Through a collaborative research and development program with the National Energy Technology Laboratory, part of the U.S. Department of Energy, WVU is opening the Rare Earth Extraction Facility to bolster domestic supplies of rare earths, reduce the environmental impact of coal-mining operations, reduce production costs and increase efficiency for processing market-ready rare earths.

Additionally, the technology could create jobs, helping to revive economies that have been historically dependent on the coal industry.

From Polluted to Playground: It's Taken 25 Years to Clean Up the Cheat River

Story by Brittany Patterson, West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On a recent sunny Wednesday, Paul Ziemkiewicz, director of the West Virginia Water Research Institute at West Virginia University, was standing on a bridge looking out at Big Sandy Creek. It was a balmy afternoon, perfect for kayaking, and the creek running the Cheat River was clear. But 25 years ago, this water was a shocking orange color -- from acid mine drainage.